On October 5th, Zepol completed the data for September in our U.S. Customs trade data tool, TradeIQ. September's results show that imports declined from August, marking the end to three straight months of growth. Furthermore, total shipments are down 10.13% from September 2008.

Below is a table showing the port regions of the world where shipments last departed before reaching the United States:
Port Region September 2009
Shipments
Percentage Change
over 2008
Percentage Change
over August 2009
Asia 528,841 -10.5% -2.7%
Europe 100,257 -7.7% -13.8%
Central America (includes Mexico)
54,533 -9.7% 2.0%
South America 20,427 -4.0% -0.9%
North America 9,404 -28.8% 9.3%
Other 8,135 1.1% 1.1%
Australia 5,755 -14.0% -8.7%
Africa 3,209 -34.2% -4.7%
Total 730,561 -10.1% -3.9%
Worldwide, ports are coping differently. Of the top ten ports by shipment activity for the last twelve months, only one experienced any growth; this was Ning Bo with an unimpressive 0.29% growth rate. Given the current state of the world economy, this is not surprising. However, given the growth of the last three months, the steep decline in trade with Singapore, Kao Hsiung, and Antwerp from August is noteworthy.

Below are the top 10 international ports by U.S. import shipment count:
Port September 2009
Shipments
Percentage Change
over 2008
Percentage Change
over August 2009
Shanghai 106,863 -7.9% 1.2%
Yantain 84,289 -12.0% -4.6%
Hong Kong 71,404 -14.6% -14.2%
Kao Hsiung 37,460 -30.9% -10.7%
Pusan 43,695 -0.4% 4.9%
Ning Bo 27,722 0.3% -0.7%
Singapore 25,155 -26.9% 11.1%
Bremerhaven 22,778 -16.8% -2.4%
Ching Tao 17,260 -7.1% -8.1%
Antwerp 12,390 -25.4% -11.0%
Zepol's U.S. Customs trade data is taken from Bills of Lading entered into the Automated Manifest System. The information represents the number of House manifests entered by importers of waterborne containerized goods. This indicator is the earliest data available for the previous month’s trade activity.